NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Intel to purchase Infineon’s Wireless      Solutions Business, called WLS, in a cash transaction valued at      approximately $1.4 billion. The deal is expected to close in the first      quarter of 2011.

 

  • WLS sale enables Infineon to expand      leading position in markets for automotive, industry and security      technologies.

 

  • WLS will operate as a standalone business.      Intel is committed to serving WLS’ existing customers, including support      for ARM-based platforms.

 

  • The acquisition expands Intel’s current      Wi-Fi and 4G WiMAX offerings to include Infineon’s 3G capabilities and      supports Intel’s plans to accelerate LTE. The acquired technology will be      used in Intel® Core processor-based laptops, and myriad of Intel® Atom™      processor-based devices, including smartphones, netbooks, tablets and      embedded computers.

 

  • The deal aligns with Internet connectivity      pillar of Intel’s computing strategy.

 

 

Neubiberg, Germany and Santa Clara, Calif., Aug. 30, 2010, CEST (Aug. 29, U.S. PDT) – Infineon Technologies AG and Intel Corporation have entered into a definitive agreement to transfer Infineon’s Wireless Solutions (WLS) business to Intel in a cash transaction valued at approximately $1.4 billion.

WLS, a leading provider of cellular platforms to top tier global phone makers, will operate as a standalone business serving its existing customers. WLS will also contribute to Intel’s strategy to make connected computing ubiquitous from smartphones to laptops to embedded computing.  “The global demand for wireless solutions continues to grow at an extraordinary rate,” said Paul Otellini, Intel president and CEO. “The acquisition of Infineon’s WLS business strengthens the second pillar of our computing strategy -- Internet connectivity -- and enables us to offer a portfolio of products that covers the full range of wireless options from Wi-Fi and 3G to WiMAX and LTE. As more devices compute and connect to the Internet, we are committed to positioning Intel to take advantage of the growth potential in every computing segment, from laptops to handhelds and beyond.

 

“The sale of WLS is a strategic decision to enhance Infineon’s value. We can now fully concentrate our resources towards strong growth in our core segments Automotive (ATV), Industrial & Multimarket (IMM) and Chip Card & Security (CCS). This creates a great perspective for all Infineon customers, employees and shareholders,” said Peter Bauer, CEO of Infineon Technologies AG.  “We all stand to benefit enormously from this deal. Thanks to the outstanding effort of the employees and the management during the last years, WLS is excellently positioned to grow further with the new owner who is ideally suited for this business.”

 

The WLS transaction is a strategic decision for Intel and Infineon. WLS complements Intel’s existing assets and enables growth in mobile computing, smartphones and embedded computing.  Infineon will benefit from this by stronger addressing three central challenges to modern society – energy efficiency, mobility and security.

 

Intel’s goal is to expand its mobile and embedded product offerings to support additional customers and market segments, including smartphones, tablets, netbooks, notebooks and embedded computing devices. Through this effort, Intel will pair WLS’ best-in-class cellular technology with its core strengths to enable the delivery of low-power, Intel-based platforms that combine its applications processor with an expanded portfolio of wireless options -- bringing together Intel’s leadership in Wi-Fi and WiMAX with WLS’ leadership in 2G and 3G, and a combined path to accelerate 4G LTE.

 

Intel expects WLS to continue growing, and remaining a standalone business to ensure continuity of existing customer sales, projects and support. The business will continue to support its customers with the best solutions possible, including ARM-based products as well as Intel-based application processor platforms with leading-edge 3G slim modem solutions.

 

WLS today holds leading positions in the field of wireless mobility and cellular platforms for smart phones and ultra-low-cost, entry phones. WLS provides baseband processors, radio-frequency transceivers, power management integrated circuits (ICs), additional connectivity features, single-chip solutions as well as the corresponding system software. This helps to enable the smooth transmission of voice and high-speed data from the backbone of the telecommunication network to the end user’s device. With annual revenue of Euro 917 million, WLS was approximately 30 percent of Infineon’s total annual revenue of Euro 3.03 billion in the past financial year.

 

The board of directors of Intel and the supervisory board and the management board of Infineon have approved the transaction. It is expected to close in the first quarter of 2011, subject to certain regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions specified in the definitive agreement.

 

About Infineon

 

Infineon Technologies AG, Neubiberg, Germany, offers semiconductor and system solutions addressing three central challenges to modern society: energy efficiency, mobility, and security. In the 2009 fiscal year (ending September), the company reported sales of Euro 3.03 billion with approximately 25,650 employees worldwide. With a global presence, Infineon operates through its subsidiaries in the U.S. from Milpitas, CA, in the Asia-Pacific region from Singapore, and in Japan from Tokyo. Infineon is listed on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange (ticker symbol: IFX) and in the USA on the over-the-counter market OTCQX International Premier (ticker symbol: IFNNY).

About Intel

Intel [NASDAQ: INTC], the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live.  Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and http://blogs.intel.com.

 

-- 30 --
 

 

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENT SAFE HARBOR

This release includes forward-looking statements about the future of Infineon's business and the industry in which we operate. These forward-looking statements are subject to a number of uncertainties, including the factors described in the "Risk Factors" section of the annual report of Infineon on Form 20-F on file with the SEC. As a result, Infineon's future business could differ materially from what is contained in these forward-looking statements. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Infineon does not undertake any obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements in light of developments which differ from those anticipated.

 

This press release contains certain forward-looking statements regarding Intel’s proposed acquisition of Infineon’s Wireless Solutions (WLS) business, including but not limited to statements regarding the projected growth in demand for wireless solutions and Internet connectivity; the expected closing of the transaction in early 2011; plans to operate WLS as a standalone business; Intel’s strategy and the contribution of WLS to such strategy; the expected growth potential of WLS and the anticipated effect of the transaction on WLS; the projected benefits of the proposed transaction

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 19, 2010 – Intel Corporation has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire McAfee, Inc., through the purchase of all of the company’s common stock at $48 per share in cash, for approximately $7.68 billion. Both boards of directors have unanimously approved the deal, which is expected to close after McAfee shareholder approval, regulatory clearances and other customary conditions specified in the agreement.

 

The acquisition reflects that security is now a fundamental component of online computing. Today’s security approach does not fully address the billions of new Internet-ready devices connecting, including mobile and wireless devices, TVs, cars, medical devices and ATM machines as well as the accompanying surge in cyber threats. Providing protection to a diverse online world requires a fundamentally new approach involving software, hardware and services.

 

Inside Intel, the company has elevated the priority of security to be on par with its strategic focus areas in energy-efficient performance and Internet connectivity.

 

McAfee, which has enjoyed double-digit, year-over-year growth and nearly 80 percent gross margins last year, will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Intel, reporting into Intel’s Software and Services Group. The group is managed by Renée James, Intel senior vice president, and general manager of the group.

 

“With the rapid expansion of growth across a vast array of Internet-connected devices, more and more of the elements of our lives have moved online,” said Paul Otellini, Intel president and CEO. “In the past, energy-efficient performance and connectivity have defined computing requirements. Looking forward, security will join those as a third pillar of what people demand from all computing experiences.

“The addition of McAfee products and technologies into the Intel computing portfolio brings us incredibly talented people with a track record of delivering security innovations, products and services that the industry and consumers trust to make connecting to the Internet safer and more secure,” Otellini added.

 

“Hardware-enhanced security will lead to breakthroughs in effectively countering the increasingly sophisticated threats of today and tomorrow,” said James. “This acquisition is consistent with our software and services strategy to deliver an outstanding computing experience in fast-growing business areas, especially around the move to wireless mobility.”

 

“McAfee is the next step in this strategy, and the right security partner for us,” she added. “Our current work together has impressive prospects, and we look forward to introducing a product from our strategic partnership next year.”

 

“The cyber threat landscape has changed dramatically over the past few years, with millions of new threats appearing every month,” said Dave DeWalt, president and CEO of McAfee. “We believe this acquisition will result in our ability to deliver a safer, more secure and trusted Internet-enabled device experience.”

 

McAfee, based in Santa Clara and founded in 1987, is the world’s largest dedicated security technology company with approximately $2 billion in revenue in 2009. With approximately 6,100 employees, McAfee’s products and technologies deliver secure solutions and services to consumers, enterprises and governments around the world and include a strong sales force that works with a variety of customers.

 

The company has a suite of software-related security solutions, including end-point and networking products and services that are focused on helping to ensure Internet-connected devices and networks are protected from malicious content, phony requests and unsecured transactions and communications. Among others, products include McAfee Total Protection™, McAfee Antivirus, McAfee Internet Security, McAfee Firewall, McAfee IPS as well as an expanding line of products targeting mobile devices such as smartphones.

 

Intel has made a series of recent and successful software acquisitions to pursue a deliberate strategy focused on leading companies in their industry delivering software that takes advantage of silicon. These include gaming, visual computing, embedded device and machine software and now security.

 

Home to two of the most innovative labs and research in the high-tech industry, Intel and McAfee will also jointly explore future product concepts to further strengthen security in the cloud network and myriad of computers and devices people use in their everyday lives.

 

On a GAAP basis, Intel expects the combination to be slightly dilutive to earnings in the first year of operations and approximately flat in the second year. On a non-GAAP basis, excluding a one-time write down of deferred revenue when the transaction closes and amortization of acquired intangibles, Intel expects the combination to be slightly accretive in the first year and improve beyond that.

 

Intel was advised by Goldman Sachs & Co. and Morrison & Foerster LLP. McAfee was advised by Morgan Stanley & Co. Inc. and Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, P.C.   

 

About Intel

Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

 

About McAfee

McAfee, Inc. (NYSE: MFE), headquartered in Santa Clara, California, is the world's largest dedicated security technology company. McAfee is committed to relentlessly tackling the world's toughest security challenges. The company delivers proactive and proven solutions and services that help secure systems and networks around the world, allowing users to safely connect to the Internet, browse, and shop the web more securely. Backed by an award-winning research team, McAfee creates innovative products that empower home users, businesses, the public sector, and service providers by enabling them to prove compliance with regulations, protect data, prevent disruptions, identify vulnerabilities, and continuously monitor and improve their security. http://www.mcafee.com.

Intel Milestone Confirms Light Beams Can Replace Electronic Signals

For Future Computers

Could Revolutionize Computer Design, Dramatically Increase Performance, Save Energy

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Intel Labs has created the world’s first silicon-based optical data connection with integrated lasers using Hybrid Silicon Laser technology.
  • The experimental chip can move data at 50 billion bits per second (50Gbps). Researchers are now pressing on to demonstrate even faster speeds.
  • The availability of low-cost, high-speed optical communications based on this technology could allow computer makers to completely rethink traditional system design from netbooks to supercomputers.
  • Businesses with server farms or datacenters could eliminate performance bottlenecks while saving significant operational costs in space and energy, replacing many cables with one optical fiber.

SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 27, 2010 – Intel Corporation today announced an important advance in the quest to use light beams to replace the use of electrons to carry data in and around computers. The company has developed a research prototype representing the world’s first silicon-based optical data connection with integrated lasers. The link can move data over longer distances and many times faster than today’s copper technology; up to 50 gigabits of data per second. This is the equivalent of an entire HD movie being transmitted each second.

Today computer components are connected to each other using copper cables or traces on circuit boards. Due to the signal degradation that comes with using metals such as copper to transmit data, these cables have a limited maximum length. This limits the design of computers, forcing processors, memory and other components to be placed just inches from each other. Today’s research achievement is another step toward replacing these connections with extremely thin and light optical fibers that can transfer much more data over far longer distances, radically changing the way computers of the future are designed and altering the way the datacenter of tomorrow is architected.

Silicon photonics will have applications across the computing industry. For example, at these data rates one could imagine a wall-sized 3D display for home entertainment and videoconferencing with a resolution so high that the actors or family members appear to be in the room with you. Tomorrow’s datacenter or supercomputer may see components spread throughout a building or even an entire campus, communicating with each other at high speed, as opposed to being confined by heavy copper cables with limited capacity and reach. This will allow datacenter users, such as a search engine company, cloud computing provider or financial datacenter, to increase performance, capabilities and save significant costs in space and energy, or help scientists build more powerful supercomputers to solve the world’s biggest problems.

Justin Rattner, Intel chief technology officer and director of Intel Labs, demonstrated the Silicon Photonics Link at the Integrated Photonics Research conference in Monterey, Calif. The 50Gbps link is akin to a “concept vehicle” that allows Intel researchers to test new ideas and continue the company’s quest to develop technologies that transmit data using over optical fibers, using light beams from low cost and easy to make silicon, instead of costly and hard to make devices using exotic materials like gallium arsenide. While telecommunications and other applications already use lasers to transmit information, current technologies are too expensive and bulky to be used for PC applications.

“This achievement of the world’s first 50Gbps silicon photonics link with integrated hybrid silicon lasers marks a significant achievement in our long term vision of ‘siliconizing’  photonics and bringing high bandwidth, low cost optical communications in and around future PCs, servers, and consumer devices” Rattner said.

The 50Gbps Silicon Photonics Link prototype is the result of a multi-year silicon photonics research agenda, which included numerous “world firsts.” It is composed of a silicon transmitter and a receiver chip, each integrating all the necessary building blocks from previous Intel breakthroughs including the first Hybrid Silicon Laser co-developed with the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2006 as well as high-speed optical modulators and photodetectors announced in 2007.

The transmitter chip is composed of four such lasers, whose light beams each travel into an optical modulator that encodes data onto them at 12.5Gbps. The four beams are then combined and output to a single optical fiber for a total data rate of 50Gbps. At the other end of the link, the receiver chip separates the four optical beams and directs them into photo detectors, which convert data back into electrical signals. Both chips are assembled using low-cost manufacturing techniques familiar to the semiconductor industry. Intel researchers are already working to increase the data rate by scaling the modulator speed as well as increase the number of lasers per chip, providing a path to future terabit/s optical links – rates fast enough to transfer a copy of the entire contents of a typical laptop in one second.

This research is separate from Intel’s Light Peak technology, though both are components of Intel’s overall I/O strategy. Light Peak is an effort to bring a multi-protocol 10Gbps optical connection to Intel client platforms for nearer-term applications. Silicon Photonics research aims to use silicon integration to bring dramatic cost reductions, reach tera-scale data rates, and bring optical communications to an even broader set of high-volume applications. Today’s achievement brings Intel a significant step closer to that goal. 

About Intel

            Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

– 30 –

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

* Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

CONTACT: Nick Knupffer             

                        408-250-7265                        

                        nick.knupffer@intel.com      

So you think your PC provides enough ‘oomph’ for you today. Why would you need extra performance anyway? Well, look back over time and you’ll have your answer. Could you wait 30 minutes to load one application? Would you cope with having to hit four keys just to underline a word or start a new paragraph? Could you do without video, music and wireless access to the Internet?

 

Many of the things you take for granted today would prove painful or even impossible on a three to four year old PC, according to Videsha Proothveerajh, country manager of Intel South Africa. “Watching High Definition (HD) internet TV and video with smooth playback or running multiple programs at the same time might prove to be some of those things you take for granted,” says Proothveerajh.

 

Back in the days in 2006, video streaming and HD did not matter that much. These days a lot of information we exchange is image-based. “Today’s multi-media computers bring this virtual world to colourful life. On today’s PCs based on an Intel Core i7 mobile processor HD video is over three times faster than its distant cousins of 2006,” says Proothveerajh. “Your life doesn’t move at one constant pace. If you’re not racing against deadlines at the office, you might be helping the kids finish homework or sharing photos and videos from vacation on Facebook and Twitter,” she says.

 

The dramatic changes the PC has undergone in the past four decades are the result of the exponential growth of the computer’s ‘brains’ called the microprocessor. The PC has transitioned from a complex tool for geeks to a magic box of tricks for everybody.

 

The future possibilities are endless. “Intel’s researchers are cooking up a number of ways to advance computing, from technology that cuts the power cord and keeps devices charged wirelessly for continuous power to an immersive and realistic 3-D Internet at your fingertips and technology that can literally read your mind,” she says.

 

“So look ahead and think where you’d like the next performance improvement to take you. Take a trip through the decades and see how far we’ve come and also where we are going,” she says.

The 1970s

The birth of the personal computer took place in its many wonderful, weird and sometimes immensely impractical forms. The Intel 4004 computer microprocessor took all of the parts that made a computer think and put them on one chip for the first time ever in 1975.

 

Dr. Martin Cooper developed the first cellular phone on 3rd April 1973, the Motorola DynaTAC phone was 9 inches long, 5 inches wide and 1.75 inches thick.

 

The 1980s

The Apple Mac, a perennial consumer favourite, made its debut in 1984.  It came with built-in audio, a draw and word programme, chess game and a spreadsheet among others.

 

The 1990s

Tim Berners-Lee develops a new technique for distributing information on the Internet – giving birth to the World Wide Web, or as we know it today, ‘www’ (1990).

 

The ‘dot-com bubble’, a speculative bubble from 1995 to 2000, saw the value of stock markets in industrialised nations rise rapidly from growth in the relatively new Internet sector and related fields.

 

The noughties

Online shopping took off in 2001. About 2.1 billion people were online worldwide.

 

YouTube, a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos was launched by three former PayPal employees in 2005. Facebook also surfaced, encouraging the rise of social media to become a huge trend involving millions of users sharing fun and personal information online.

 

Smart phones, the third generation of mobile technology, enabled additional multimedia features. Email, internet, and data transfer became a standard feature.

 

Ends

About Intel

Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

21st century learning and technology skills has become a reality with a helping hand from Intel to students from schools in Heidelberg and Winterton who have started reaping the benefits of having computer labs at their premises. The labs, donated by Intel in partnership with Fairbairn Capital joBerg2c, were officially handed over to schools as part of the Fairbairn Capital joBerg2c race which started last month from Heidelberg to Scottbourgh.

 

According to Videsha Proothveerajh,  Intel South Africa Country Manager, these labs are not only about teaching students how to use computers but will equip them with skills like technology literacy, communication, critical thinking, and collaboration – commonly referred to as 21st century skills which are the foundation for knowledge creation and the springboard for future innovators. “Technology in the classroom is key to imparting these skills,” she says.

 

“The Central Department of Education and the Provincial Department of Education of KwaZulu-Natal fully supports our computer labs donation program, with the understanding of the critical skills that are enabled by technology” says Proothveerajh.  “Intel donated 30 Classmate PCs with the WiFi network installation to AG Visser primary school in Heidelberg and Schittdrift primary school in Winterton.”

 

“In addition to the computer labs we have donated, Intel is also involved in a project in partnership with Qhubeka where students are encouraged to plant tree seeds which will later be planted along the route and at their schools,” says Proothveerajh. “Students who plant and grow more than 150 trees will receive food parcels and bicycle gifts, this teaches the students about sustainability and speaks to Intel’s commitment to the environment as part of our green IT initiatives” she says.

 

Intel’s computer labs donation is part of its World Ahead Program whose goal is to expand access to 21st Century opportunities around the world by integrating and extending Intel’s efforts in pillars such as accessibility, connectivity, education and content.

 

Ends

 

About Intel

 

Intel, the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

© 2008 Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.

 

* Intel, Centrino and the Intel Logo are registered trademarks of the Intel Corporation in the USA or other countries. Other brands or product names are the property of the respective owners.

Rugged convertible classmate PC design moves the way kids do

 

Johannesburg, 07 June 2010 – Intel Corporation announced two weeks ago that the African release of the most flexible and durable Intel-powered convertible classmate PC reference design to date. This new addition combines ruggedness, full PC functionality with enhanced e-learning capabilities and improved performance with energy efficiency.

 

Building on the success of the clamshell and convertible classmate PC designs, Intel and the Intel Learning Series Alliance members provide classrooms around the world with a custom-built solution for primary school education.

 

Featuring the Intel Atom processor and a 10.1” LCD monitor, the new convertible classmate PC includes increased memory and storage to run education applications that help students excel in their studies and build skills for the future. The new design can change instantly from a clamshell to a tablet PC, allowing students to naturally switch form factors as they move between activities and locations in the classroom, an observation that Intel ethnographic researchers have termed “micro-mobility”.

 

"Our ethnographers have spent countless hours understanding how technology can help school age children here in Africa and around the world build the skills required for the future," said Shelly Esque, vice president, legal and corporate affairs and director corporate affairs group at Intel Corporation, "At Intel, we believe that education has the power to transform the lives of individuals, villages, cities and nations, and we understand that technology is one of our greatest tools to advance education around the world."

 

Built to move the way kids do, the new Intel-powered convertible classmate PC features a touch-screen with a user interface optimized for eReading applications, water-resistant keyboard, touchpad and screen, improved ruggedness with drop test from desk height, bump and scratch resistance surfaces and structures, and an optional anti-microbial keyboard. In tablet mode, the "palm rejection" feature ignores the touch of hands resting on the screen, allowing students to write and draw intuitively.

 

In addition to being powered by the power-efficient Intel Atom processor, the new classmate PC features a rechargeable battery with up to 8.5 hours of battery life so students and teachers don't have to worry about plugging in. It also includes integrated wireless connectivity with WiFi and provides the options of 3G, GPS and WiMAX for easy network and Internet connections.

 

For additional information about the Intel-powered classmate PC, including photos and videos, visit the press kit at www.intel.com/pressroom/kits/classmatePC. Additional information is also available at www.intel.com/intel/worldahead/classmatepc and www.intellearningseries.com.

 

Ends

 

About Intel

Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

Christian Gordon final.jpg

29 July 2010, Johannesburg - Intel Corporation and MTN Group have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) which will see the companies collaborate to accelerate the deployment and penetration of broadband access to Africa and the Middle East.

 

The collaboration covers a wide spectrum of initiatives including areas such as broadband access through WiMax deployment, affordable PC bundles for the ordinary African consumer and entrepreneurs as well as cost effective internet browsing devises.

 

Other areas of collaboration include MTN Foundation and Intel Education’s Corporate Social Responsibility initiatives, which will see Intel and MTN joint efforts focusing on equipping students and teachers with Technology skills. These initiatives will support ensure that Africa’s youth is equipped with 21st century skills such as critical thinking and collaboration as well as maths and sciences focus enabling them to thrive and take advantage of the knowledge economy.

 

“MTN and Intel’s strategies to connect the next generation of broadband users in Africa and the Middle East were a perfect fit, which is why we went into discussions to collaborate ” says Jacques van Schalkwyk Territory Manager for South and Sub Saharan Africa at Intel . “Both companies have expertise in the different aspects of ICT deployment and together we can accelerate bridging the digital divide in Africa.”

 

Says MTN Group’s Senior Vice President, Commercial and Innovation: “MTN recognises the strategic value of partnering with an industry player of Intel calibre and stature. We believe this MOU will facilitate the establishment of joint initiatives to support our broadband strategy as well as CSR projects.”

 

The memorandum underpins the importance of Industry leaders such as Intel and MTN to collaborate in order to bring sustainable ICT development to the region. “In this way we can accelerate the African entry into the 21st century Knowledge and digital economy which will give Africa’s citizen the same economic opportunities as available in the developed countries.” Concludes Van Schalkwyk

About Intel and Intel World Ahead

Intel [NASDAQ: INTC], the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and http://blogs.intel.com.

 

Through its World Ahead Program, Intel strives to improve education, health care, entrepreneurship and government services in developing countries worldwide by accelerating access to computers, connectivity and localized Internet content. Additional information is available at www.intel.com/changingtheworld and www.intel.com/intel/worldahead/index.htm.

Intel and the Intel logo are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

* Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

 

MTN BOILERPLATE

 

Launched in 1994, the MTN Group is a multinational telecommunications group, operating in 21 countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The MTN Group is listed on the JSE Securities Exchange in South Africa under the share code: "MTN". As at 31 March 2010, MTN recorded 123,5 million subscribers across its operations in Afghanistan, Benin, Botswana, Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, Cyprus, Ghana, Guinea Bissau, Guinea Republic, Iran, Liberia, Nigeria, Republic of Congo (Congo Brazzaville), Rwanda, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Syria, Uganda, Yemen and Zambia. For more information, visit www.mtn.com.

Videsha Proothveerajh- WEB.JPG

 

Videsha Proothveerajh Intel Corporation South Africa Country Manager has been recognised as the most Influential Woman in Business and Government for ICT by CEO magazine in a ceremony held on Friday the 30th of July 2010.

 

South Africa’s Most Influential Woman in Business and Government (MIW) recognises woman across South Africa who are helping transform the country’s social, economic and political landscape. Through a public nomination process and in conjunction with industry bodies and an expert panel of judges the finalists and winners are chosen.

 

The ICT category recognises woman who have claimed their rightful role in an industry that has a reputation of being male dominated in South Africa. Studies have indicated that only about 20% of the current ICT workforce is female, even less so in leadership roles.

 

Proothverajh has been heading up Intel South African Operations for just over a year and prior her promotion was a key member of the Intel team since early 2008 and instrumental in taking Intel’s multinational client business to new levels of success by building value adding relationships with key multinational partners, which has raised the Intel’s profile significantly in this area. She has a B.Com degree, a post graduate degree in Business Management and an MBA specializing in Advanced Strategic Management which she obtained with a distinction.

 

“Being a woman in the ICT sector at this time in the country is exciting and rewarding. ICT will continue to drive economic growth and leapfrog Africa into the knowledge economy. There is currently a unacceptable number of girls leaving school with good mathematics and science marks to pursue careers in ICT. My vision is to be a role model and champion of the possibilities and opportunities in this robust sector and ultimately we can see a shift towards a more gender equal sector” says Proothverajh

 

Proothverajh has spent the past 11 years working with very high-profile ICT companies. Prior to joining Intel, she worked for EDS South Africa as a client delivery executive. In addition to that she was Partner Account and Channel Manager and subsequently Partner Group Manager for Microsoft South Africa.  She is also a wife and a mother of two children.

 

 

Ends

 

About Intel

 

Intel, the world leader in silicon innovation, develops technologies, products and initiatives to continually advance how people work and live. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

© 2008 Intel Corporation. All rights reserved.

 

* Intel, Centrino and the Intel Logo are registered trademarks of the Intel Corporation in the USA or other countries. Other brands or product names are the property of the respective owners.

Pictures 009.jpgDespite the almost universal recognition of education as a key pillar which will support the prosperity of the South African nation, the pass rates of Matric students hit an all-time low last year with just 60.6% of candidates succeeding. This underscores the presence of a deep crisis in South African education – but government is sitting up and taking notice, amending policies and also seeking to introduce more support for teachers. It is arguably through the introduction of technology-driven and supported approaches in the classroom of the future that learners will be equipped with the skills they need to perform in the modern world.

 

The question which is being begged in the media, by government and by the private sector is whether or not Outcomes Based Education (OBE) is to blame for the decline in the Matric pass rate, from 73.3% in 2003, to its current low level and is the lack of locally relevant content part of the issue.

 

A direction taken by the Department of Education in the 1990s, OBE is not a new concept; it has been applied in countries including the United States of America and Australia. OBE differs from ‘traditional’ education in that it is focused on measuring student performance, which are called outcomes, whereas traditional approaches focus on the resources that are available to the student, which are called inputs.

 

Perhaps ironically, however, among the key reasons cited for the failure of OBE is that there was a lack of the necessary inputs and support structures. In a recent article on news website, education specialist Graeme Bloch described the approach as optimistic and overly complex. Notably, he pointed to the fact that only 8% of the 27000 government schools have libraries and 10% have Internet connections. ‘Despite that, the OBE syllabus required pupils to research a crippling number of assignments,’ notes the article.

 

While OBE is being shown the door, important lessons remain. Studies have found that education and GDP are directly proportional. To be competitive in the global economy, nations must prepare today’s students to thrive in tomorrow’s workforce. Education experts have identified the skills needed to succeed in an increasingly knowledge-based society. Skills like technology literacy, communication, critical thinking, and collaboration – commonly referred to as 21st century skills – are the foundation for knowledge creation and the springboard for future innovators.

 

Technology in the classroom is key to imparting these skills and 1:1 e-learning where every student is equipped with a computer is the ideal environment. But using technology to improve education requires more than just putting PCs in the classroom. Students need to be engaged. Teachers need technology that easily integrates into their existing curriculum, and training on how to use it. Schools need products and content that is locally appropriate, easily deployed, and simple to maintain. As well as this, governments need cost-effective, comprehensive solutions that help them effectively manage a transition to 1:1 education.

 

The classroom of the future is one in which teachers must know how to use technology as an instructional tool. Teachers must wield the skills and enjoy access to the resources to integrate computer technology effectively into existing curriculum; technology tools and strategies are necessary to enhance learning through research, communication, productivity and assessment.

 

To this end, government’s Teacher Laptop Initiative is arguably a strong step in the right direction. By putting a computer and connectivity in the hands of every teacher, the first steps towards addressing that stunning statistic are taken.

 

At Intel we believe that access to 21st century education is a right of every child. This is the only way that our children will be able to compete on equal terms with their global counterparts and it will also open up a world of opportunities for the learners that would not otherwise be available to them under current conditions.

 

 

About Intel

Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at www.intel.com/pressroom and blogs.intel.com.

So you think your PC provides enough ‘oomph’ for you today. Why would you need extra performance anyway? Well, look back over time and you’ll have your answer. Could you wait 30 minutes to load one application? Would you cope with having to hit four keys just to underline a word or start a new paragraph? Could you do without video, music and wireless access to the Internet?

 

Many of the things you take for granted today would prove painful or even impossible on a three to four year old PC, according to Videsha Proothveerajh, country manager of Intel South Africa. “Watching High Definition (HD) internet TV and video with smooth playback or running multiple programs at the same time might prove to be some of those things you take for granted,” says Proothveerajh.

 

Back in the days in 2006, video streaming and HD did not matter that much. These days a lot of information we exchange is image-based. “Today’s multi-media computers bring this virtual world to colourful life. On today’s PCs based on an Intel Core i7 mobile processor HD video is over three times faster than its distant cousins of 2006,” says Proothveerajh. “Your life doesn’t move at one constant pace. If you’re not racing against deadlines at the office, you might be helping the kids finish homework or sharing photos and videos from vacation on Facebook and Twitter,” she says.

 

The dramatic changes the PC has undergone in the past four decades are the result of the exponential growth of the computer’s ‘brains’ called the microprocessor. The PC has transitioned from a complex tool for geeks to a magic box of tricks for everybody.

 

The future possibilities are endless. “Intel’s researchers are cooking up a number of ways to advance computing, from technology that cuts the power cord and keeps devices charged wirelessly for continuous power to an immersive and realistic 3-D Internet at your fingertips and technology that can literally read your mind,” she says.

 

“So look ahead and think where you’d like the next performance improvement to take you. Take a trip through the decades and see how far we’ve come and also where we are going,” she says.

The 1970s

The birth of the personal computer took place in its many wonderful, weird and sometimes immensely impractical forms. The Intel 4004 computer microprocessor took all of the parts that made a computer think and put them on one chip for the first time ever in 1975.

 

Dr. Martin Cooper developed the first cellular phone on 3rd April 1973, the Motorola DynaTAC phone was 9 inches long, 5 inches wide and 1.75 inches thick.

 

The 1980s

The Apple Mac, a perennial consumer favourite, made its debut in 1984.  It came with built-in audio, a draw and word programme, chess game and a spreadsheet among others.

 

The 1990s

Tim Berners-Lee develops a new technique for distributing information on the Internet – giving birth to the World Wide Web, or as we know it today, ‘www’ (1990).

 

The ‘dot-com bubble’, a speculative bubble from 1995 to 2000, saw the value of stock markets in industrialised nations rise rapidly from growth in the relatively new Internet sector and related fields.

 

The noughties

Online shopping took off in 2001. About 2.1 billion people were online worldwide.

 

YouTube, a video-sharing website on which users can upload, share, and view videos was launched by three former PayPal employees in 2005. Facebook also surfaced, encouraging the rise of social media to become a huge trend involving millions of users sharing fun and personal information online.

 

Smart phones, the third generation of mobile technology, enabled additional multimedia features. Email, internet, and data transfer became a standard feature.

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