Intel Capital portfolio company OpenFeint announced today that it is being acquired by Gree. Intel Capital invested in OpenFeint in 2010, providing strategic and operational planning guidance, industry introductions and financial support that enabled the company to focus on growing the business. Commenting on the acquisition, outgoing Co-Founder and Chairman of OpenFeint Peter Relan said "From day one, working with Intel Capital has been excellent for OpenFeint. Not only did the Intel Capital brand validate OpenFeint's vision for mobile social gaming, but it also attracted a lot of other strategic partners to do business with OpenFeint." The OpenFeint investment is another success for Intel Capital's Consumer Internet investment team, which maintains a portfolio of 30 companies in the social media, online commerce, mobile web and monetization platform infrastructure space. Intel Capital has a decidedly international and stage agnostic Consumer Internet approach, with investments in iFeng (Phoenix New Media) and Okaybuy in China, Vostu and boo-box in Latin America, Yatra.com and July Systems in India and Nokta and iMall in Eastern Europe, as well as US-based companies including Betaworks, Yume, Kabam and Kno.

With Royal Wedding mania hitting fever pitch, the Intel AppUpSM center today launched A Royal Wedding Celebration – a new app for supported PCs with everything royal fans need to know about the wedding of the decade. Containing nine info-packed sections exploring William and Kate’s early lives, their love story and all the behind-the-scenes gossip, including the route Kate will take on her wedding day, the app will be updated with photos from the wedding day itself, bringing one of the most anticipated events of the year to life on your PC.

The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at the University of Texas at Austin today became the first National Science Foundation TeraGrid institution to work with Intel to support the national open science community in building applications that take full advantage of the Intel many integrated core (MIC) architecture. TACC now joins more than 100 other Intel partners porting software to the Intel MIC processor-based software development platform. Intel’s forthcoming MIC processors are designed to achieve tremendous performance for applications that possess a high degree of data parallelism, including molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry, as well as such emerging data-intensive applications as seismic imaging, sensor network analysis and real-time analytics. For more information on Intel and TACC’s collaboration, check out The Server Room blog post.

Intel Corporation and Micron Technology, Inc., today expanded their NAND flash memory joint venture operations with the official opening of the IM Flash Singapore fabrication facility. The $US 3 billion state-of-the-art 300 millimeter facility is currently ramping production of the companies’ industry-leading 25 nanometer NAND flash memory and is anticipated to employ more than 1,200 employees.

Money may not grow on trees, but algae grows on our roof! As part of a research project, Intel employees in Arizona determined a way to harness the carbon dioxide emitted by an Intel chip factory in order to grow algae, which can be used to create clean-burning biofuel. Learn more.

The First Semiconductor Company to Obtain LEED Silver Certification for a Manufacturing Campus

 

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Intel's Ocotillo manufacturing campus in Arizona received LEED silver certification for Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance.
  • Intel is the first semiconductor or industrial technology company to obtain LEED certification for an entire manufacturing campus.
  • A team of Intel employees determined a way to harness the carbon dioxide emitted by the Ocotillo manufacturing facility in order to grow algae for biofuel.

 

 

SANTA CLARA, Calif., April 21, 2011 –Intel® Corporation became the first semiconductor or industrial technology company to obtain LEED certification by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) for a manufacturing campus. A certificate from LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is an internationally recognized stamp of approval. The LEED silver certification for "Existing Buildings: Operations & Maintenance" went to Intel's entire Ocotillo campus in Arizona, a site that includes three generations of wafer fabrication plants, support and office buildings.

 

As a result of Intel's longstanding environmental conservation efforts, no capital improvements were required to achieve the certification. Notable features of the campus include:

 

  • Semiconductor Industry Association benchmark data shows that Intel's Ocotillo campus utilized 26 percent less energy than the average semiconductor campus.
  • Two-hundred and 300 kW solar electricity support structures were erected in the Ocotillo campus parking lot in 2010. Currently ranking amongst the 10 largest solar installations in its utility territory, the Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) generated by these installations are transferred to the local utility to support their regulatory obligations and programs.
  • In 2010, the Ocotillo campus recycled 90 percent of its solid waste (more than 10,000 tons) and achieved 66 percent site wide water conservation, saving approximately 5 million gallons of fresh water per day.
  • The Ocotillo campus utilizes a pipe that feeds water not suitable for drinking from the City of Chandler's waste water treatment plant directly back to Intel. As a result, 100 percent of the irrigation water and 95 percent of the cooling tower water is non-potable.
  • One-hundred percent of captured storm water is retained onsite.

 

"Given the complexity and size of the Ocotillo campus, it was an immense undertaking to seek certification of this manufacturing campus," said Brian Krzanich, senior vice president and general manager of Manufacturing and Supply Chain for Intel. "We take these steps not just in Arizona, but at our other facilities around the world, because we see a combination of economic advantages and opportunities to reduce our environmental impact, which in turn betters our business."

 

Intel has a policy of designing all new buildings to a minimum of LEED Silver and is also committed to making strategic improvements to its existing locations. In fact, in April 2010, Intel announced that it had received LEED Gold certification for Intel Design Center 9 in Haifa, Israel. That same month, KM 1, an Intel factory and office building in Kulim, Malaysia, achieved basic LEED certification for strategic improvements made to the 14-year-old facility.

 

Growing Algae on the Roof

 

Apart from striving to meet the green building requirements laid out in the LEED rating system, Intel engineers are constantly innovating with sustainability in mind. A team of such innovators at the Ocotillo campus determined that the carbon dioxide emissions produced by the fabrication facility ("the fab") were well-suited to grow algae, which can be used to create clean-burning biofuel.

 

Working with Arizona State University (ASU), the team erected a small proof-of-concept model on the roof of the Ocotillo fab, which demonstrates the capture of boiler emissions, the use of the emissions to grow algae, and the conversion of those algae into biofuel. This sort of carbon recycling could reduce the overall carbon emissions of the fab and, by creating a sustainable alternative fuel, displace the carbon emissions of burning fossil fuels from the Intel boilers.

 

The next phase of the project will focus on measuring the amounts of carbon captured, identifying options for implementing the concept on a larger scale, and assessing how algae-based carbon recycling should be recognized under various regulatory regimes. The Intel and ASU participants plan to continue to make their research results publicly available under the open, collaborative research model the team has established.

 

This project is part of Intel's Sustainability in Action program, through which employees can secure funding to share Intel's expertise in environmental sustainability with communities around the world. This program is a key element in Intel's efforts to engage all employees and drive corporate responsibility and sustainability deeper into the corporate culture.

 

 

 

 

Fab32.jpg

The exterior of Fab 32 on the Intel Ocotillo campus. Fab 32, a chip factory, is one of 12 buildings on the campus that has achieved LEED Silver certification.

OC2.jpg

The exterior of OC 2 on the Intel Ocotillo campus. OC 2 is one of 12 buildings on the campus that has achieved LEED Silver certification.

Algae1.jpg

The proof-of-concept model on the roof of the Ocotillo chip factory, which demonstrates the capture of emissions, the use of the emissions to grow algae, and the conversion of that algae into biofuel.

Algae2.jpg

The proof-of-concept model on the roof of the Ocotillo chip factory, which demonstrates the capture of carbon emissions, the use of the emissions to grow algae, and the conversion of that algae into biofuel.

 

About Intel
Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at newsroom.intel.com and blogs.intel.com.

 

Intel is a trademark of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

 

* Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Filter News Archive

By author:
By date:
By tag: