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Small Businesses Burdened by Aging PCs

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Intel Research Finds Older PCs Reduce Employee Productivity, Raise Maintenance Costs, May Increase Security Risks

 

NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

  • Small businesses are keeping PCs longer than in previous years, generating higher repair costs that can equal or exceed the price of new PCs.
  • Forty-two working hours are lost when an older PC needs repair.
  • Forty-seven percent of small businesses are unaware of Microsoft ending service support for Windows XP*.

 

 

SANTA CLARA, Calif., Oct. 29, 2013 – On average, small business workers lose more than one work week per year due to old PCs, according to a recent multi-country study commissioned by Intel Corporation and conducted by Techaisle.

 

The Intel Small Business PC Refresh Study surveyed 736 small businesses in Brazil, China, Germany, India, Russia and the United States to gauge the state of their PC equipment. According to the findings, small businesses are holding onto PCs significantly beyond the recommended refresh date, with more than 36 percent owning PCs that are more than 4 years old. These machines require more maintenance, exerting a greater toll on employee productivity and higher equipment costs than the purchase of a new machine.

 

"Upgrading to new PCs is one of the wisest choices a small business can make," said Rick Echevarria, vice president of PC Client Group and general manager of Business Client Platform Division at Intel. "PCs are largely considered the foundation for many of these companies, and this study makes a clear cut case for refreshing them on a regular basis."

 

Key findings from the research:

  • Older PCs negatively impact work performance – On average, employees lose 21 more hours by using a PC that is 4 years or older due to time needed for repairs, maintenance and security issues as compared to PCs that are less than 4 years old. Repair and maintenance is 1.5 times more frequent on PCs that are 4 years or older.
  • Repair costs for older PCs either equal or exceed the purchase price of new PCs – Small businesses are spending an average of $427 to repair a PC that is 4 years or older. This is 1.3 times the repair cost of PCs that are less than 4 years old.
  • Security risks and other costs will increase in 2014 – Forty-seven percent of respondents were unaware that Microsoft is ending service support for the popular Windows XP* platform, placing a higher maintenance burden directly on small businesses. Moreover, since automatic updates will no longer be provided to help protect PCs, valuable business data is more vulnerable to security risks and viruses.
  • Small businesses in the United States are using the oldest PCs – Of the countries surveyed, 8 percent of small businesses in the United States are running PCs that are 5 years or older, in contrast to only 5 percent of small businesses worldwide and 1 percent in India.

 

New Intel-Powered PCs Are Lifting the Burdens of Small Businesses
New 2 in 1s, all-in-ones, desktop PCs and Ultrabooks powered by 4th generation Intel® Core™ vPro™ processors offer businesses lower total cost of ownership, better battery life and faster performance for business productivity applications over 4-year-old systems. Additionally, an alternative to Intel Core vPro processors, PCs with Intel® Small Business Advantage (SBA) can automate maintenance for small businesses without a dedicated IT staff.

 

Survey Methodology
The Intel Small Business PC Refresh Study was conducted by Techaisle on behalf of Intel in April. A total of 736 small businesses (1-99 employees) based in Brazil, China, Germany, India, Russia and the United States completed a 20-minute questionnaire. Respondents consisted of IT decision makers with a sampling quota fixed by employee size categories. Results on this study prepared by TechAisle are available for download at intel.com.

 

Infographic

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About Intel
Intel (NASDAQ: INTC) is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices. Additional information about Intel is available at newsroom.intel.com and blogs.intel.com.

 

Intel is a trademark of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

 

* Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

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