Images: 16-Year-Old Engineer Works to Improve Spinal Surgery Using Machine Learning and Computer Vision

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Photo 1: Allison Jia (from left), Krithik Ramesh and Rachel Seevers celebrate on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. Ramesh, of Greenwood Village, Colorado, was awarded the Gordon E. Moore Award and $75,000, for developing a machine learning technology for orthopedic surgeons. Jia, of San Jose, California, and Seevers of Lexington, Kentucky, were each recognized with the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award of $50,000. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 2: Allison Jia (from left), Krithik Ramesh and Rachel Seevers celebrate on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. Ramesh, of Greenwood Village, Colorado, was awarded the Gordon E. Moore Award and $75,000, for developing a machine learning technology for orthopedic surgeons. Jia, of San Jose, California, and Seevers of Lexington, Kentucky, were each recognized with the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award of $50,000. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 3: Allison Jia (from left), Krithik Ramesh, Rachel Seevers and Shriya Reddy were honored Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. Ramesh, of Greenwood Village, Colorado, was awarded the Gordon E. Moore Award and $75,000, for developing a machine learning technology for orthopedic surgeons. Jia, of San Jose, California, and Seevers of Lexington, Kentucky, were each recognized with the Intel Foundation Young Scientist Award of $50,000. Reddy, of Northville, Michigan, was awarded the Craig R. Barrett Award for Innovation of $10,000. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 4: Krithik Ramesh, 16, of of Greenwood Village, Colorado, received top honors with the Gordon E. Moore Award of $75,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. He used augmented reality, machine learning and computer vision to help orthopedic surgeons achieve greater accuracy for screw placement during spinal surgery. (Credit: Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public)

Photo 5: Allison Jia, 17, of San Jose, California, received one of two Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards of $50,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. She investigated toxic tau protein aggregates, which spread in neurons in the human brain and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 6: Rachel Seevers, 17, of Lexington, Kentucky, received one of two Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards of $50,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. She designed, built and tested a rigid, energy-efficient prototype of an underwater propulsion device that mimics the way jellyfish move through the water. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 7: Shriya Reddy, 15, of Northville, Michigan, was awarded the newly announced Craig R. Barrett Award for Innovation of $10,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. She was honored for her novel, noninvasive approach for rapidly diagnosing melanoma lesions. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 8: Krithik Ramesh, 16, of of Greenwood Village, Colorado, received top honors with the Gordon E. Moore Award of $75,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. He used augmented reality, machine learning and computer vision to help orthopedic surgeons achieve greater accuracy for screw placement during spinal surgery. (Credit: Chris Ayers/Society for Science & the Public)

Photo 9: Allison Jia, 17, of San Jose, California, received one of two Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards of $50,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. She investigated toxic tau protein aggregates, which spread in neurons in the human brain and are associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 10: Rachel Seevers, 17, of Lexington, Kentucky, received one of two Intel Foundation Young Scientist Awards of $50,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. She designed, built and tested a rigid, energy-efficient prototype of an underwater propulsion device that mimics the way jellyfish move through the water. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Photo 11: Shriya Reddy, 15, of Northville, Michigan, was awarded the newly announced Craig R. Barrett Award for Innovation of $10,000 on Friday, May 17, 2019, at the 2019 Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, a program of Society for Science & the Public and the world’s largest international pre-college science competition. She was honored for her novel, noninvasive approach for rapidly diagnosing melanoma lesions. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

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