Intel’s news source for media, analysts and everyone curious about the company.

Images: Intel Travels to Africa to Closely Track Responsibly Sourced Tech Minerals

  • Ingots of pure tin at the LuNa Smelter in Kigali, Rwanda. A team
  • A shipping container in which tin ore is kept under lock and key
  • Adam Schafer, director of Supply Chain Sustainability at Intel,
  • Miners employed by Rutongo Mines Ltd., north of Kigali, Rwanda,
  • Cassiterite, the ore from which tin is extracted, sifts through
  • A miner at the Piran Resources Ltd. mine, near Kigali, Rwanda. A
  • Carts of mineral ore are hauled out of a mine run by Rutongo Min
  • A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as rep
  • An engineer with the Wolfram Mining and Processing mine takes vi
  • Workers inside the Wolfram Mining and Processing mine at Rwinkwa
  • A worker inside a tin mine run by the Comikagi cooperative, near
  • Workers approach a mountainside mine run by the Comikagi coopera

» Download all images (ZIP, 364 MB)

Photo 1: Ingots of pure tin at the LuNa Smelter in Kigali, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 2: A shipping container in which tin ore is kept under lock and key to prevent theft. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 3: Adam Schafer, director of Supply Chain Sustainability at Intel, inspects bags of ore that have been sealed and tagged to confirm its provenance. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 4: Miners employed by Rutongo Mines Ltd., north of Kigali, Rwanda, with bags of cassiterite, which is used to manufacture tin. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 5: Cassiterite, the ore from which tin is extracted, sifts through the hands of a worker in Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 6: A miner at the Piran Resources Ltd. mine, near Kigali, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 7: Carts of mineral ore are hauled out of a mine run by Rutongo Mines Ltd., north of Kigali, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 8: A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visit mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 9: An engineer with the Wolfram Mining and Processing mine takes visitors on a tour of the company’s mine at Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 10: Workers inside the Wolfram Mining and Processing mine at Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 11: A worker inside a tin mine run by the Comikagi cooperative, near Nyamugali, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

Photo 12: Workers approach a mountainside mine run by the Comikagi cooperative, near Nyamugali, Rwanda. A team from Intel’s Responsible Minerals Program, as well as representatives of other tech firms, visited mineral-rich Rwanda in November 2019 as part of an industry effort to ensure a legal and ethical supply chain. Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold mined in the Central African country are key components of silicon chips that run today’s smartphones, laptops, servers and other high-tech gear. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

More: Intel Travels to Africa to Closely Track Responsibly Sourced Tech Minerals