Blog: Shaping Tomorrow’s Generation of Engineers, Today

By Danielle Brown, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, Intel Corporation

danielle-brown-rwdNational Engineers Week is upon us, and it is a great time to raise awareness and interest in engineering and technology careers — and the possibilities that they offer.

At Intel, technology and engineering are part of our DNA and we believe a diverse engineering workforce is critical to driving continued innovation and growth in our industry. To achieve our industry’s true potential, we must strive to build and continually foster a culture that is broadly representative and inclusive of all kinds of diversity, including, but not limited to, gender and ethnicity. Only through a collective and unified effort will we be able to effectively accomplish this.

Earlier this month, Intel released the 2015 Diversity & Inclusion Report that outlines our progress toward achieving a goal to achieve full representation in our U.S. workforce by 2020, and provides an update on our investments to support Diversity & Inclusion in our workforce and our industry at large. While we exceeded our annual hiring goal, achieved our overall retention goal, and achieved 100 percent gender pay parity across U.S. job types and job levels, we still have a great deal of work and opportunity ahead of us.

A key component of our strategy is building and strengthening the pipeline of women and underrepresented minorities who are interested in pursuing technology and engineering careers. As part of our $300 million commitment to support diversity and inclusion in technology, we have invested in numerous pipeline programs and partnerships focused on attracting a more diverse pool of candidates to the technology industry. Through a multi-pronged approach of education initiatives, financial assistance and internship and job opportunities that offer concrete work experience and an opportunity to develop technical skills, Intel is paving the way for people to enter and succeed in tech careers like engineering and computer science.

These programs include an investment of $5 million in the Oakland Unified School District over the next five years to implement a comprehensive, education transformation solution, a partnership with the Science Foundation of Arizona and the Navajo Nation to implement a comprehensive education transformation at three Arizona high schools, the Latinos in Technology Scholarship Initiative that provides $3.75 million in scholarships to Latino college students, and an investment of $5 million in a Georgia Institute of Technology program designed to build a pipeline of diverse engineers.

This week, we are thrilled to announce a new partnership with San Francisco-based CODE2040

As part of the initiative, Intel is investing $1.3 million over the course of three years to support CODE2040’s Fellows and Technical Application Prep (TAP) Programs, which aim to inspire and support more women and underrepresented minorities to earn technical degrees. The effort aims to bridge the gap between education and employment through providing mentoring, resume prep and internship guidance. In 2016 and 2017, Intel will host a total of 60 student interns from the CODE2040 Fellows Program at its Santa Clara campus in order to provide an immersive experience and one-on-one mentorship with our top engineers. In support of the CODE2040 TAP Program, Intel will also host students for part of the five day Tech Trek, which will launch this year with support from Intel.

The skills of the workforce of the future will depend as much on curiosity, creation and design as technical aptitude. To encourage girls’ curiosity and interest in STEM, we are excited to embark on another new partnership with fashion designer Rebecca MinkoffThis partnership will include a series of activities in 2016 that will include college campus visits, design ideation camps and hackathons designed to connect these young women to role models and career opportunities in STEM. By constructing events that highlight the creative opportunities that exist in technology, Intel and Rebecca Minkoff are working to expand the pipeline of future female engineers. Today at 11 am PST, Rebecca Minkoff and Sandra Lopez from Intel’s New Devices Group will be hosting a Reddit AMA where they will discuss how they see technology driving innovation in fashion, and the creative opportunities for women in technology.

At Oakland Unified School District, we are launching our Intel ambassadors’ mentoring program for students who have selected STEM education pathways. We feel that we can positively impact the school district’s retention rate by engaging students in services such as mentoring. And for the first time in Intel’s history, we will host OUSD students at the Intel Education Services Corps’ three-week immersive experience in the U.S. this summer. Employees across the world will converge in Oakland to meet with OUSD students and show them one-on-one about the professional opportunities that await them in computer science.

National Engineers Week presents a special time to shine a spotlight on an exciting, evolving field that is growing exponentially more transformative and significant every day. Our programs and investments aim to create awareness and opportunity for students, to build the pipeline of talent for the future of our industry. At Intel, our passion for engineering extends year-round as we remain committed to creating the tools, resources and programs that will continue to attract women and underrepresented minorities to the exciting possibilities of a career in technology and engineering.

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